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Novak Djokovic, world’s current number one tennis star, has been denied entry to Australia and is being detained at the Melbourne Airport where he landed last night to participate in the Australian Open 2022.

Daily Mail reported that Novak Djokovic would be deported back to Serbia, his home country, because his visa application was rejected.

The 34-year-old was issued a letter by the Australian government saying his visa had been denied and he would be deported, a source close to the tournament said tonight. 

The story tells that the Australian Border Force was not convinced that Djokovic provided appropriate evidence to meet their entry requirements. Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison tweeted that Djokovic’s visa had been cancelled.

Novak Djokovic

Image @ Word Matters

While the denial of visa to Djokovic is being called by the Australian authorities a result of visa application mix-up, the actual bone of contention seems to be the tennis star’s refusal to take the COVID shots required to participate in the event. Djokovic recently bragged about getting a medical exemption from vaccination to play in the Australian Open this year as the defending champion. His announcement set mainstream media on fire as they bashed him and the Australian Open administration for allowing an exemption.

Serbian Support for Novak Djokovic

Daily Express reported today that Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic slammed the Australian authorities for harassing Djokovic.

Serbian president Aleksandar Vucic insists the entire country is behind tennis icon Novak Djokovic and has blasted Australia by claiming they are “harassing” the world No 1.

Vucic posted on Instagram that he talked to Djokovic on phone and told the Serbian tennis star that the entire Serbia backs him, adding that “Serbia will fight for Novak Djokovic.”

Djokovic’s father Srdjan was cited saying on Wednesday evening that if his son was not released in half an hour they will gather on the street.

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